Are you tired of the subscription model content yet?

If you’re like me, you subscribe to all kinds of stuff these days. Accented during COVID-19[feminine], the urge to get people to pay a small recurring charge for their entertainment, technology, or almost anything these days has become the way of the world. The subscription model is great for businesses because it gives a level of predictability to incoming revenue that wouldn’t normally be there and is great for the bottom line, projections and more. The problem is this: Consumers are growing tired of all the “death by 1,000 cuts” charges on their credit card and they are revolting.

For the first time, Netflix recently announced that it has 200,000 people drop their service. Nobody ever gives up on Netflix, do they? I guess now they do. The stock price fell 35% almost overnight. Billionaire investors bailed out the company because what they liked was the predictability of earnings. Maybe this party is over? 99% of their subscriber base doesn’t seem to think so, but they’re now trying to find ways, for the first time, to crack down on password sharing as well as offer an ad-based model at a lower price. cost. These are BIG changes.

CNN launched its CNN+ paid content model just a few weeks ago in April 2022. In less than a month and despite its introductory price, CNN ended its highly publicized paid service. Apparently, only 10,000 people signed up for this value-added content. Critics call it “CNN Minus” and for good reason.

Home theater lovers have so many places we can spend our entertainment dollars these days. In my world, I have DirecTV for over $150 a month (NHL package and Showtime as add-ons on top of a mid-tier content package). They are constantly trying to jack up my prices despite:

a) I am the only person in the house looking at this source

and…

b) I have been a loyal customer since 1997 when they launched.

services

We also have Netflix which is getting more and more expensive, but we resisted cancelling. We have Disney+ for an extra $13 per month. We also have Hulu. We have Amazon Music, which is part of a Prime membership (perhaps the best option due to retail and entertainment options) and more. Outside of entertainment, I have Adobe for $30 a month for Photoshop. I’m about to cancel The New York Times for $17 a month. I already canceled the Washington Post, but I didn’t cancel the Los Angeles Times for its local relevance. There are others.

My dad is currently a professor at NYU and his millennial students are increasingly against subscription models and these kids haven’t spent a single day in the real world with full time jobs and real and non-academic responsibilities. It’s not a good predictor of the growth of the subscription model, good as it is for the companies that adopt it.

Since leaving the AV publishing world in December 2019, I’ve embarked on a site that works with one of my passions, which is Daily Fantasy Sports (DFS as it’s called). It was one of those COVID-19 businesses that exploded while we were all locked down. I bought DraftKings (DKNG) stock for $31 per share and took it to $72. I sold it for $29. Ouch. In a few days, I will be shutting down my sports advice site DFS, i.e. a subscription model that suffered the worst financial loss of my career as a publisher. Clearly, the subscription model is in trouble for all but the apex predators.

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Streamlined subscription model

For audio-video enthusiasts, there are many ways to benefit from these subscription models. For audiophiles, the allure of having ALL records ever made on CD (or even higher quality) available on demand for the price of one compact disc per month should have been a game-changer. The biggest problem with the audiophile hobby is its inability to adapt to new technology, as “OK Boomers” love the past, hate science when given the opportunity to embrace conspiracy theories, and they do facing imminent death because of it. For home theater enthusiasts, the need for a silver disc is over, but Oppo Blu-ray players that are now 10 years old sell for two, three or four times their retail price when Sony (and others) make disc players that read all formats for $200 or less. 4K content streams better and with little to no loss in quality. The 90-day delay (or less) between theatrical releases and their streaming debut makes owning a Roku or a device like an Apple TV impossible to avoid for any home theater. The cord-cut was an early sign of consumers’ lack of tolerance for content bullshit. Rejecting streamer abuse in the subscription industry is the next step on the chessboard.

Streaming is not going anywhere and YES you will have to pay for it, but there is a limit to the number of hands available for your mainstream media spend. For old jerks, Gen-Exers like me, we used to spend our last dollar on Tower Records (or Video) but today it’s different. No one is going to abandon Amazon Prime because of its overall value, but there are plenty of subscription models that will experience attrition in the months-years to come. This consolidation is well deserved and heavily affected by the so-called “end of COVID” which is not over except in the will of most people to take it more seriously.

The streaming market and its tangential subscription model have exploded in recent years, but it’s the pending “correction” that’s predictable. Take a look at your credit card bill and see how many people you’ve spent with them and it’s easy to withdraw. I definitely have more changes to come, but I won’t be pulling out of the streaming/subscription business altogether. I’m just going to organize my expense list by quality and value. You too. These are good days, but you can’t spend it all all the time. We will all find the happy place for our budgets and go from there.

What subscription services do you have and do you plan to change them seasonally depending on the content offered?

embarrassed posts on May 14, 2022 4:22 PM

Netflix announced that 200,000 people had canceled their Netflix subscriptions, causing the streaming service’s stock prices to plummet. But subscription streaming services aren’t going anywhere soon, and yes, you’ll have to pay for them. But for audio-video enthusiasts, there are plenty of ways to benefit from these subscription models.

The streaming market and its tangential subscription model have exploded in recent years, but it’s the pending “correction” that’s predictable. Take a look at your credit card bill and see how many people you’ve spent with them and it’s easy to withdraw. I definitely have more changes to come, but I won’t be pulling out of the streaming/subscription business altogether. I’m just going to organize my expense list by quality and value. You too. These are good days, but you can’t spend it all all the time. We will all find the happy place for our budgets and go from there.

What subscription services do you have and do you plan to change them seasonally depending on the content offered?

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Lily: Are you tired of the subscription model content yet?

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